GYLFAGINNING ENGLISH PDF

Geri and Freki the war-mighty glutteth, The glorious God of Hosts; But on wine alone the weapon-glorious Odin aye liveth. The ravens sit on his shoulders and say into his ear all the tidings which they see or hear; they are called thus: Huginn[1] and Muninn. Then said Gangleri: "What have the champions to drink, that may suffice them as abundantly as the food? Or is water drunk there? I know, by my faith! I can tell thee a different tale of this.

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Geri and Freki the war-mighty glutteth, The glorious God of Hosts; But on wine alone the weapon-glorious Odin aye liveth. The ravens sit on his shoulders and say into his ear all the tidings which they see or hear; they are called thus: Huginn[1] and Muninn. Then said Gangleri: "What have the champions to drink, that may suffice them as abundantly as the food?

Or is water drunk there? I know, by my faith! I can tell thee a different tale of this. That tun is so great [1. Then said Gangleri: "These are marvellous tidings which thou now tellest. A wondrous great house Valhall must be; it must often be exceeding crowded before the doors. Now what is the sport of the champions, when they are not fighting? But what thou hast said is true: Odin is of great might. Then said Gangleri: "Who owns that horse Sleipnir, or what is to be said of him?

But he demanded as wages that he should have possession of Freyja, and would fain have had the sun and the moon. On the first day of summer, if any part of the citadel were left unfinished, he should lose his reward; and he was to receive help from no man in the work. But Thor had then gone away into the eastern region to fight trolls.

When it lacked three days of summer, the work had almost reached the gate of the stronghold. But when he became frightened, then he swore oaths, that he would so contrive that the wright should lose his wages, cost him what it might. The stallion, perceiving what manner of horse this was, straightway became frantic, and snapped the traces asunder, and leaped over to the mare, and she away to the wood, and the wright after, striving to seize the stallion.

These horses ran all night, and the wright stopped there that night; and afterward, at day, the work was not done as it had been before. But Loki had such dealings with Svadilfari, that somewhat later he gave birth to a foal, which was gray and had eight feet; and this horse is the best among gods and men. Is there no ship equally great? Has Thor never experienced such a thing, that he has found in his path somewhat so mighty or so powerful that it has overmatched him through strength of magic?

Though there may have been something so powerful or strong that Thor might not have succeeded in winning the victory, yet it is not necessary to speak of it; because there are many examples to prove, and because all are bound to believe, that Thor is mightiest. Therefore thou must believe that he will not lie for the first time now, who never lied before.

About evening, Thor took his he-goats and slaughtered them both; after that they were flayed and borne to the caldron. When the cooking was done, then Thor and his companion sat down to supper. Then Thor laid the goat-hides farther away from the fire, and said that the husbandman and his servants should cast the bones on the goat-hides.

There is no need to make a long story of it; all may know how frightened the husbandman must have been when he saw how Thor let his brows sink down before his eyes; but when he looked at the eyes, then it seemed to him that he must fall down before their glances alone. Thor clenched his hands on the hammer-shaft so that the knuckles whitened; and the husbandman and all his household did what was to be expected: they cried out lustily, prayed for peace, offered in recompense all that they had.

Then, when they had walked a little while, there stood before them a great forest; they walked all that day till dark. As soon as it had become dark, they sought themselves shelter for the night, and found before them a certain hall, very great: there was a door in the end, of equal width with the hall, wherein they took up quarters for the night.

But about midnight there came a great earthquake: the earth rocked under them exceedingly, and the house trembled. Thor sat down in the doorway, but the others were farther in from him, and they were afraid; but Thor gripped his hammer-shaft and thought to defend himself. Then they heard a great humming sound, and a crashing. Then Thor thought he could perceive what kind of noise it was which they had heard during the night.

But what? Hast thou dragged. Thor replied that they were just then about to go to sleep; then they went under another oak.

It must be told thee, that there was then no fearless sleeping. Did some acorn fall on my head? Or what is the news with thee, Thor? Art thou awake, Thor? But if not so, then turn back, and I think it were better for you to do that; but if ye will go forward, then turn to the east. As for me, I hold my way north to these hills, which ye may how see. Then they saw a castle standing in a certain plain, and set their necks down on their backs before they could see up over it.

They went to the cattle; and there was a grating in front of the castle-gate, and it was closed. Thor went up to the grating, and did not succeed in opening it; but when they struggled to make their way in, they crept between the bars and came in that way. They saw a great hall and went thither; the door was open; then they went in, and saw there many men on two benches, and most of them were big enough.

What manner of accomplishments are those, which thou and thy fellows think to be ready for? No one shall be here with us who knows not some kind of craft or cunning surpassing most men. Then a trough was taken and borne in upon the hall-floor and filled with flesh; Loki sat down at the one end and Logi at the other, and each ate as fast as he could, and they met in the middle of the trough.

By that time Loki had eaten all the meat from the bones, but Logi likewise had eaten all the meat, and the bones with it, and the trough too; and now it seemed to all as if Loki had lost the game. But it will be made manifest presently, when they run the third heat.

Then all said that that game had been proven. Then Thor answered that he would most willingly undertake to contend with any in drinking. Still he was very thirsty; he took and drank, and swallowed enormously, and thought that he should not need to bend oftener to the horn.

But I know that thou wilt wish to drink it off in another draught. When he took the horn from his mouth and looked into it, it seemed to him then as if it had decreased less than the former time; but now there was a clearly apparent lowering in the horn.

Thou wilt not shrink from one more drink than may he well for thee? Then he gave up the horn and would drink no more. It may readily be seen that thou gettest no advantage hereof.

But what game will ye now offer me? But the cat bent into an arch just as Thor stretched up his hands; and when Thor reached up as high as he could at the very utmost, then the cat lifted up one foot, and Thor got this game no further advanced.

She has thrown such men as have seemed to me no less strong than Thor. Yet it was not long before Thor fell to his knee, on one foot. Thor answered that he could not say that he had not got much shame in their dealings together. And this I know, by my troth! But I made ready against thee eye-illusions; and I came upon you the first time in the wood, and when thou wouldst have unloosed the provision-bag, I had bound it with iron, and thou didst not find where to undo it.

Where thou sawest near my hall a saddle-backed mountain, cut at the top into threesquare dales, and one the deepest, those were the marks of thy hammer. I brought the saddle-back before the blow, but thou didst not see that. So it was also with the games, in which ye did contend against my henchmen: that was the first, which Loki did; he was very hungry and ate zealously, but he who was called Logi was "wild-fire," and he burned the trough no less swiftly than the meat.

But now, when thou comest to the sea, thou shalt be able to mark what a diminishing thou hast drunk in the sea: this is henceforth called "ebb-tides. That cat was not as it appeared to thee: it was the Midgard Serpent, which lies about all the land, and scarcely does its length suffice to encompass the earth with head and tail.

So high didst thou stretch up thine arms that it was then but a little way more to heaven. It was also a great marvel concerning the wrestling-match, when thou didst withstand so long, and didst not fall more than on one knee, wrestling with Elli; since none such has ever been and none shall be, if he become so old as to abide "Old Age," that she shall not cause him to fall.

Another time I will defend my castle with similar wiles or with others, so that ye shall get no power over me. Then he turned back to the castle, purposing to crush it to pieces; and he saw there a wide and fair plain, but no castle.

But it is a true tale that then he resolved to seek if he might bring about a meeting between himself and the Midgard Serpent, which after ward came to pass. Now did Thor ever take vengeance for this? Thor abode as guest there overnight; but at dawn Hymir arose and clothed himself and made ready to row to sea a-fishing.

Then Thor sprang up and was speedily ready, and asked Hymir to let him row to sea with him. Thor became so enraged at the giant that he was forthwith ready to let his hammer crash against him; but he forced himself to forbear, since he purposed to try his strength in another quarter.

He asked Hymir what they should have for bait, but Hymir bade him get bait for himself. Then Thor turned away thither where he, saw a certain herd of oxen, which Hymir owned; he took the largest ox, called Himinbrjotr,[1] and cut off its head and went therewith to the sea. By that time Hymir had shoved out the boat. Hymir rowed forward in the bow, and the rowing proceeded rapidly; then Hymir said that they had arrived at those fishing-banks where he was wont to anchor and angle for flat-fish.

But Thor said that he desired to row much further, and they took a sharp pull; then Hymir said that they had come so far that it was perilous to abide out farther because of the Midgard Serpent.

Thor replied that they would row a while yet, and so he did; but Hymir was then sore afraid. Now as soon as Thor had laid by the oars, he made ready a very strong fishing-line, and the hook was no less large and strong.

Then Thor was angered, and took upon him his divine strength, braced his feet so strongly that he plunged through the ship with both feet, and dashed his feet against the bottom; then he drew the Serpent up to the gunwale. And it may be said that no one has seen very fearful sights who might not see that: bow Thor flashed fiery glances at the Serpent, and the Serpent in turn stared up toward him from below and blew venom.

Then, it is said, the giant Hymir grew pale, became yellow, and was sore afraid, when he saw the Serpent, and how the sea rushed out and in through the boat. Thor hurled his hammer after it; and men say that he struck off its head against the bottom; but I think it were true to tell thee that the Midgard Serpent yet lives and lies in the encompassing sea. And Thor waded to land.

A very great deed of valor did Thor achieve on that journey.

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Gylfaginning

Etymology[ edit ] The etymology of "Edda" remains uncertain; there are many hypotheses, but little agreement. Some argue that the word derives from the name of Oddi , a town in the south of Iceland where Snorri was raised. Edda could therefore mean "book of Oddi. Faulkes in his English translation of the Prose Edda commented that this is "unlikely, both in terms of linguistics and history " [4] since Snorri was no longer living at Oddi when he composed his work. That is, with the same meaning, the name of a character in the Rigsthula and other medieval texts. It relies on the fact that the word "kredda" meaning "belief" is certified and comes from the Latin "credo", "I believe. Edda in this case could be translated as "Poetic Art".

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